The Chorus Impact Study

The Chorus Impact Study:  How Children, Adults and Communities Benefit from Choruses

In 2009 Chorus America commissioned a study of choruses in American life with two primary goals: first, to update baseline research that Chorus America commissioned in 2003, which sought to remedy the absence of information about choral singers, choruses and their impact; and second, to gather data to shed light on the role of choral music experience in childhood education and development, as viewed from the perspective of educators and parents.

The study was conducted by Grunwald Associates LLC (Bethesda, Md.), who examined the attitudes, opinions and activities of more than 2,000 singers in choruses of all kinds, 500 members of the general public, 500 parents and 300 K-12 educators from throughout the United States using online surveys. In addition, to estimate the number of choruses and choral singers, the research team used reliable sources such as Trimedia and others (see Methodology for details).

The picture that emerges from this data is striking. Across a wide variety of qualities found in successful people, there are strong associations between these characteristics and chorus participation. This powerful connection applies to both adults and children.

In virtually every case, parents of children in choruses are significantly more likely to ascribe to their children nearly every positive quality tested than parents whose children have never been part of a chorus. Adult singers are significantly more likely to ascribe these qualities to themselves than are average Americans. Moreover, adult singers consistently credit their chorus participation for those positive attributes, parents credit chorus participation for these qualities in their children, and overwhelming majorities of educators believe choral participation has a wide variety of positive effects beyond even those identified by choral singers and choir parents. And yet, though they acknowledge the myriad benefits of participation in choral music, an alarming number of educators and parents report that there is no choral program in their schools.

Key Findings

Finding 1: Choral singing continues to be the most popular form of participation in the performing arts.

Finding 2: Adults who sing in choruses are remarkably good citizens.

Finding 3: Children who sing in choruses have academic success and valuable life skills.

Finding 4: The decline in choral singing opportunities for children and youth is a key area for concern.

Reprinted with permission

The Chorus Impact Study Executive Summary and Key Findings

The Chorus Impact Study Full Report

The Chorus Impact Study

The Chorus Impact Study:  How Children, Adults and Communities Benefit from Choruses

In 2009 Chorus America commissioned a study of choruses in American life with two primary goals: first, to update baseline research that Chorus America commissioned in 2003, which sought to remedy the absence of information about choral singers, choruses and their impact; and second, to gather data to shed light on the role of choral music experience in childhood education and development, as viewed from the perspective of educators and parents.

The study was conducted by Grunwald Associates LLC (Bethesda, Md.), who examined the attitudes, opinions and activities of more than 2,000 singers in choruses of all kinds, 500 members of the general public, 500 parents and 300 K-12 educators from throughout the United States using online surveys. In addition, to estimate the number of choruses and choral singers, the research team used reliable sources such as Trimedia and others (see Methodology for details).

The picture that emerges from this data is striking. Across a wide variety of qualities found in successful people, there are strong associations between these characteristics and chorus participation. This powerful connection applies to both adults and children.

In virtually every case, parents of children in choruses are significantly more likely to ascribe to their children nearly every positive quality tested than parents whose children have never been part of a chorus. Adult singers are significantly more likely to ascribe these qualities to themselves than are average Americans. Moreover, adult singers consistently credit their chorus participation for those positive attributes, parents credit chorus participation for these qualities in their children, and overwhelming majorities of educators believe choral participation has a wide variety of positive effects beyond even those identified by choral singers and choir parents. And yet, though they acknowledge the myriad benefits of participation in choral music, an alarming number of educators and parents report that there is no choral program in their schools.

Key Findings

Finding 1: Choral singing continues to be the most popular form of participation in the performing arts.

Finding 2: Adults who sing in choruses are remarkably good citizens.

Finding 3: Children who sing in choruses have academic success and valuable life skills.

Finding 4: The decline in choral singing opportunities for children and youth is a key area for concern.

Reprinted with permission

The Chorus Impact Study Executive Summary and Key Findings

The Chorus Impact Study Full Report

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